Tunnel of Light in Nabana

A bit behind reporting on this well after the holidays, but I couldn’t help myself from showing you all photos from the nationally-known illumination of Nabana-no-Sato, a small tourist-centric village an hour outside of Nagoya City. The illuminations were fantastic: a long white tunnel of flower lights opened way to a beautiful light show based on the tale of Heidi, while the exits included a brand new blue tunnel of such intensity I couldn’t actually photograph it properly. Going was a five-year-long dream finally realized, and though I went alone, I had a great time. It was also a great finish to my last Christmas season in Japan.

35 thoughts on “Tunnel of Light in Nabana

    • Alex Hurst says:

      Definitely. I was really happy to finally make it out there, too…. though it was a shame I could only stay in the area for a couple of hours.

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  1. saraletourneau says:

    Oh my goodness… Nabana is absolutely stunning. I’ve been to holiday light displays here in the US, but they don’t compare to this. Thank you for sharing, Alex!

    Just curious, but do you know how they made that “fire light” display with the trees? (I wasn’t sure what else to call it…)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alex Hurst says:

      You’re welcome! The fire display is actually just a bright light illuminating the natural fall colors of the Japanese maple (though I have a hunch that these trees were dyed, as it was pretty late in the season for such vivid reds). The maples are pretty naturally vivid though…. I love autumn here for that very reason. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Alex Hurst says:

      Thanks for dropping by, Jeff. 🙂 I’m a sucker for illuminations, so it was going to be impossible to pass up a chance to share the photos, even a month late. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Alex Hurst says:

      You should! 😀 Japan is going to be a lifelong destination for me, for sure. Though I think it’s easier to travel and see things as a tourist, than it is to live here and try to do the same thing.

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  2. shoreacres says:

    It is beautiful beyond words, but I have to know — were the tunnels disorienting? There’s a blue light tunnel-type installation at our museum in Houston, and it’s just slightly unnerving to walk through. It’s as though the loss of perspective affects my balance.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alex Hurst says:

      The cream-light tunnel wasn’t so bad. There were enough color variations to not feel too lost or upside down… but yeah, the blue tunnel was quite disorienting. It was hard to get a bearing on where the ground and depth of vision were correct and where they were being warped by the intense hue of the blue.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. i002537 says:

    Dear Alex,
    I saved this read until a quiet morning before I read and I had no idea it was you.
    It is beautiful. You keep surprising me. I didn’t know there was a “small tourist-centric village” in Japan.

    Why not, I suppose. I don’t think of Japan and anything Tourist-centric. I must rethink America.
    I know Disneyland and Tombstone and Orlando but I would be sad to find out some places here were made to be tourist-centric.
    I am such a …a…I don’t know. I forget the word. It is that kind of day.
    You must go to the Burn someday. It is 7 days of this. I suppose it is tourist-centric. I thought it was art…
    Love
    EB

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alex Hurst says:

      Oh, it it definitely art, especially the Burn! And here, too, it was art, but it was surrounded by nothing but what a tourist would want or need — souvenir shops, expensive restaurants, and hotels. No actual people live there. That is what I meant. 🙂 It was on a little peninsula between cities, population: 0.

      I think there is a trend in some American cities to embody their postcard image: Sante Fe is a good example of this. My father just went through there… used to love the town, but he said it is all “adobe” now, forced authenticity.

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