J is for 旅行

J is for ryokou, or the Japanese word for a travel-related Journey. One of the nicest things about being in Japan is its close proximity to other countries. NJ and I have been lucky enough to be able to visit a couple of them during school breaks (our yearly bonuses from work), though it isn’t uncommon to hear students talking about recent trips to Guam, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, or India, as well.

Taipei and Seoul were both fun cities with plenty to do, tons to eat, and (in Taipei in particular,) a bunch of really cool places to go. A miniatures museum, honey toast cafes at every turn, exquisite palaces, and a calla lily festival were some of the hallmarks of these trips, though honestly, the museums are what I adored the most.

Taipei is a city I would absolutely love to travel to again. The people were friendly, the spaces were wide and open and clean; the food was fantastic. While Seoul’s food was to die for, I was pretty disappointed by the unending clouds of Chinese yellow dust, and the smell of sewage all over the city.

In the end, my travels gave me some new appreciations of Japan… and a multicultural stomach. Hopefully I’ll have the opportunity to do more traveling through some other continents once I’m situated in Vancouver.


 


 

Images hosted on Flickr. 

https://flic.kr/p/nXGfW1

Taipei, Taiwan

Taipei, Taiwan

https://flic.kr/p/nHew7m

https://flic.kr/p/nZzqcf

Taipei, Taiwan

Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea

45 thoughts on “J is for 旅行

    1. They’re padlocks put on a special chainlink fence by couples are are trying to “lock” their love for each other, so they won’t be separated. 🙂

      Like

    1. No, they’re actually from a tower in Seoul where couple go to leave their locks in the hope that they won’t break up. 🙂 There were almost a thousand of them on the chainlink fence overlooking the city.

      Like

    1. That was an old palace in Seoul! I couldn’t believe it was free to go in and see! It was so colorful. 🙂 My pictures really don’t do it justice.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I think having the possibility to taste different food is one of the joys of getting in contact with different cultures.
    I’ll just say that when I lived in Dublin, I shared my room with a Pakistani gilr and a Chinese girl who, just like me, loved cooking. I’ll let you imagine by yourself what we did inside that kitchen 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Woah~! You must have had fusion food out the whazoo! How fun! I’ve never tried Pakistani food… what kind of food is it?

      Like

      1. Very spicy as you may imagine, but I love spicy food. It uses a lot of vegetables and a lot of different souces.

        You can’t imagine. Sometimes one of us would cook and the others would do the clean up, sometimes each one of us would cook something.
        We did have lots of fun 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I just point and click! The camera does all the work. ^^; But, thank you! I was really partial to the graffiti myself. 🙂 It just looked really cool.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderful photos – the food looks deelish! and that colorful ceiling is eye-popping. My daughter worked in South Korea for a year and had a wonderful time touring that country for a month before she came home.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The food was amazing~ so, so good. That must have been really amazing for your daughter! I’m hoping one day I’ll have another chance to work abroad for a time. 🙂

      Like

  3. Lovely pics. Great set of padlocks. Here people are starting to put padlocks on a bridge for the same type of thing. Very early days but hopefully it will catch on as it makes for a fantastic pic 🙂

    Like

  4. Some are trying to import that padlock tradition into Dublin, Alex, on a beloved old pedestrian toll bridge called the Ha’penny Bridge in the city centre. It’s a nice idea, but it’s destroying the bloody bridge, so there’s a lot of people peeved that a monument of the city is having its metalwork mangled by teenagers who fall out of love the following week!! But that’s my curmudgeonly sentiment for the day. I love your photos, they’re gorgeous.

    Like

  5. So glad I found your blog, Alex. Your photos are exceptional and your exposure to the Japanese culture and language really cool. I forwarded your link to my daughter who got to spend a few weeks last summer in Tokyo, also teaching preschoolers. She will enjoy this, I’m sure. See you on Monday with letter K.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love the intricacy of those carvings. Buildings here are just so boring compared to those! We need to work more at surrounding ourselves with beauty in our physical environment.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I agree with Liz. You’ve had some awesome opportunities to see and learn more about the world, Alex. Normally I’d say I’m jealous, since I haven’t done much travelling myself… But instead, it’s inspiring me more and more to one day take that leap. Once I get a couple other priorities in order first, though. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. As everyone’s already said — great photos as usual! I’m catching up on blog reading, and reading three in a row makes me feel like I just traveled a little bit. I’m already missing Japan for you! Your writings and images show just how much you’ve loved it there and made the most of the experience.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Honey toast cafe? Umm, I want one next door. And with all the delectable sounding foods you’ve come across on your travels, I’d suffer leaving that part the most. Being surrounded by exotic dishes I could never pass on, I would surely end up being a building with feet. But I’ve seen pics of you on your bike. I’m guessing you and NJ have no issues with keeping it all off.
    And many thanks for the lovely words on my post today, Alex. You have such an eloquent way of putting your thoughts into tender form. They meant a lot. Cheers

    Like

  10. What a beautiful blog you have, Alex, and what delicious photographs–and not just the food ones. You give definition to the phrase “eye candy.” Thank you for sharing your images and your travels with us.

    Like

  11. A multicultural stomach in more than one sense of the word. 🙂
    Besides the exposure to different sights & smells, I can imagine the different tastes your palate was subjected to!
    Great photos as per usual!

    Like

  12. It’s very cool that you got the chance to do that.

    I went and checked for a copy of Shogun. They had the rest of the series but not that one.

    Liked by 1 person

        1. Yeah, they’re the world’s largest used book store. I’ve been able to find out of print, signed, first editions, etc. it’s fantastic. 🙂

          Like

Comments are closed.