T is for Tapestry

I was going to make a long post about metaphor and writing again for today, but I’ve decided to talk about something far more personal and simple instead. My favorite children’s book.

I am certain that anyone who is reading this blog now had a favorite book when they were still small, but if someone were to ask me, I would saw The Weaving of a Dream, by Marilee Heyer is mine.

The story revolves around an old woman, a mother of three strapping boys, who one day comes across a most gorgeous painting in the market where she sells her weavings. She resolves that she must live in a place like that or surely die, but the youngest son suggests she instead weave the palace in the painting. She finds this a reasonable compromise, and spends many years on the task, much to the chagrin of her older, lazier sons.

No sooner does the woman complete her tapestry, however, than a wind rips through her house and steals the weaving away. It is up to the brothers to go and fetch it back for her, before her broken heart kills her.

In the tradition of fairy tales and repetitions of three, it is not surprising that the two older sons fail to fulfill their oaths, but the trials the youngest must face are truly what make this story stand out to me. It is a wonderful read, with absolutely stunning images, and a treat for any who open its pages.

I can only hope I can write that simply, yet beautifully in the end… and draw like that. Oh, if there was an artist to learn from for me, it would be Marilee Heyer!

What was, or is, your favorite children’s book?

Tomorrow: U is for Unabridged!

20 thoughts on “T is for Tapestry

  1. Celine Jeanjean says:

    Those illustrations are beautiful! That is reason enough to buy the book.

    My favourite book was The Little Prince – I still read it now every so often. It’s beautifully simple and yet it speaks about deep, human truths.

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    • Alex Hurst says:

      Yes… I love the illustrations. I would just sit there and stare for hours. If only I had such remarkable skill! …But, at least I have my words!

      Like

    • Alex Hurst says:

      Yeah… My father gave me a bunch of old children’s books from when I was a kid. They are proudly on my shelf now, even though I don’t have kids. πŸ˜‰ I haven’t read Black Beauty yet… I loved the movie though.

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    • Alex Hurst says:

      I love “A Wrinkle in Time”, too! I still remember the little diagram about the ant and a straight line, even though it’s been nearly 20 years since I’ve read it. πŸ™‚

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  2. Myas says:

    Black Beauty by Anna Sewell – I’ve always loved horse and still do. Now that I’ve seen the Pegasus on Clash of the Titans… I definitely want one.

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  3. Miranda Stone says:

    My favorite children’s book has to be The Kincaid’s Book of Witches, Goblins, Ogres and Fantasy (long out of print, but since my copy of the book fell apart, I was thrilled to find a used copy for sale on Amazon years ago, and it’s still proudly displayed on my bookshelf).

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  4. Jelly-Side Up says:

    This is so cool! I’ve never read or heard of this children’s book, but now it’s on my must-read list! I love the story and technique you describe (and of course the way you describe it!).

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  5. deborahbrasket says:

    The book sounds fascinating! I’ll have to see if I can find it.

    I loved fairy tales as a child and my mother had bought me a set of “My Book House”, 12 encyclopedia-size volumes that start with nursery rhymes and go up through the ages to biographies of famous people. It was a classic in its time. I still have it. My favorite fairy tales were “Beauty and the Beast,” “East o’ the Sun and West O’ the Moon,” and “The Snow Queen.”

    And “A Wrinkle in Time” has been one of my favorites too, as it seems it has been for others commenting here.

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